MANICARIA SACCIFERA PDF

We present data about the phenology, floral morphology, floral biology, reproductive system, and pollination. Flowering occurs all year round with a peak between April and May. A single individual may produce up to five inflorescences in its reproductive period. Flowers are visited by 10 species of insects. The inflorescences in the female-phase do not offer reward and insects are attracted by olfactory mimicry; in the male-phase flowers reward visitors with pollen and a place to oviposit.

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Excerpts from Jim Conrad's Naturalist Newsletter. Seabeans are seeds and fruits of many kinds deposited on shore by ocean currents, often from far away.

There's a whole beachcombing subculture of seabean-collecting traveler known as seabeaners. This week that website helped me identify what's shown above. That's a fruit. Cracking it open you see what's shown below:. The identification page, or Sea-Bean Guide, at the seabean site called our three-lobed fruit a Sea Coconut or Golf Ball, which didn't tell me much.

But they also gave the technical name, which helped a lot. It grows spottily from Belize to Brazil and Peru, so, taking into account our sea currents these days depositing much trash from Trinidad, Columbia and Venezuela, I'd guess that the fruit came from thereabouts. Manicaria saccifera is a tall, stately palm famed as producing gigantic leaves -- up to 26ft long 8m. Where it grows, people often call it Palma Real, or Royal Palm, but here another palm species is better known by that name.

From pictures on the Internet it seems that typically this species' wave-deposited fruits bear only one or two seeds inside, instead of three like ours. All the seeds in our fruit were waterlogged and dead. Manicaria saccifera mainly inhabits swamps and estuarine areas where rivers meet the ocean.

Unfortunately these are precisely the places people like to convert to banana production, so these palms are threatened by enormous habitat loss. Earlier their big leaves were favored by the poor as roof thatching but now the trend is toward plastic and tin, which is easier to collect. A seabeaner in Florida blogs that Manicaria saccifera 's fruits and seeds are among the most commonly found on the Eastern Florida coast. Elsewhere I read that finding a Sea Coconut covered by the bumpy outer husk, as ours is, is rare.

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Manicaria saccifera

We are working on a subset of plants in the PFAF database identified as having the most potential for inclusion in such designs. We are adding search terms and icons to those plants pages, and providing a range of search options aligned to categories of plants and crop yields, with Help facilities including videos. Commonly found in South America, Manicaria saccifera or commonly known as Ubussu is an evergreen, large, single-stemmed palm of up to 10 m tall and 15 - 20 cm stem diameter. It is used medicinally to treat asthma, cough, thrush, and diarrhea. Young leaves are cooked as a vegetable but has to be boiled for 15 minutes to destroy harmful glucosides. The roots are cooked as well; it has high carbohydrate content.

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Excerpts from Jim Conrad's Naturalist Newsletter. Seabeans are seeds and fruits of many kinds deposited on shore by ocean currents, often from far away. There's a whole beachcombing subculture of seabean-collecting traveler known as seabeaners. This week that website helped me identify what's shown above. That's a fruit. Cracking it open you see what's shown below:. The identification page, or Sea-Bean Guide, at the seabean site called our three-lobed fruit a Sea Coconut or Golf Ball, which didn't tell me much.

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Pollination Ecology of the Manicaria saccifera (ARECACEAE): A Rare Case of Pollinator Exclusion

Manicaria saccifera Gaertn. If you have any useful information about this plant, please leave a comment. Comments have to be approved before they are shown here. If you would like to support this site, please consider Donating. Home Search Contact.

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