CREATE ACROFIELDS PDF

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The examples here are limited to a description of the procedures associated with completion of a PDF; the download will contain examples of PDF creation in both Visual Basic and C. The examples contained herein are dependent upon the availability of the iTextSharp DLL; use the link provided previously in order to download the DLL locally to your development machine. The form contains controls and may be filled out programmatically so it serves as a good example.

PDF documents that do not contain controls; those meant to be printed and filled in with a pencil, cannot be completed using this approach. Further, though not demonstrated here, one can also use iTextSharp to create a PDF document with embedded controls. The solution consists of a single Win Forms project with a single form.

All of the project code is contained with the single Windows form. The form itself contains only a docked textbox used to display all of the field names from an existing PDF document. The completed PDF is generated and stored in the local file system; the PDF is not opened for display by the application.

The template PDF itself is never populated and it is used only to define the format and contents of the completed PDF. Figure 2: Solution Explorer. As was previously mentioned, all of the code used in the demonstration application is contained entirely in the project's single Windows form.

The following section will describe the contents of the code file. The file begins with the appropriate library imports needed to support the code. Note that the iTextSharp libraries have been included into the project. The namespace and class declaration are in the default configuration. The next section of code contains the default constructor and the form 1 load event handler. During form load, two functions are called; those functions are used to display all of the fields present in the template PDF and to create a new PDF populated with a set of field values.

Checkbox controls may be a little more challenging to figure out. I tried passing several values to the checkbox controls before lining up a winner. In this example, I tried pass zero, one, true, false, etc. The next section of code in the demo project is used to fill in the mapped field values.

The process is simple enough, the first thing that happens is that that the template file and new file locations are defined and passed to string variables. Once the paths are defined, the code creates an instance of the PDF reader which is used to read the template file, and a PDF stamper which is used to fill in the form fields in the new file. Once the template and target files are set up, the last thing to do is to create an instance of the AcroFields which is populated with all of the fields contained in the target PDF.

After the form fields have been captured, the rest of the code is used to fill in each field using the field's SetField function. In this example, the first worksheet and the W-4 itself are populated with meaningful values whilst the second worksheet is populated with sequential numbers which are then used to map those fields to their location on the PDF.

To finish up the PDF, it is necessary to determine whether or not additional edits will be permitted to the PDF after it has been programmatically completed.

This task is accomplished by setting the FormFlattening value to true or false. If the value is set to false, the resulting PDF will be available for edits, if the value is set to true, the PDF will be locked against further edits. View All. Scott Lysle Updated date, Dec 04, Append de. After the PDF has been filled out, the application reads values from the PDF the first and last names in order to generate a message indicating that the W-4 for this person was completed and stored.

This article described an approach to populating a PDF document with values programmatically; this functionality was accomplished using the iTextSharp DLL. Further, the article described an approach for mapping the fields contained in PDF and may be useful if one is dealing with a PDF authored elsewhere and if the programmer does not have access to Adobe Professional or Adobe Designer.

The iTextSharp library is a powerful DLL that supports authoring PDFs as well as using in the manner described in this document; however, when authoring a PDF, it seems that it would be far easier to produce a nice document using the visual environment made available through the use of the Adobe tools. Having said that, if one is dynamically creating PDFs with variable content, the iTextSharp library does provide the tools necessary to support such an effort; with the library, one can create and populate a PDF on the fly.

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Reading Acrofields from PDF Files

Word will ask you where to save the PDF file you're creating. Select your desktop or Fileshare and click OK. At this point you have a basic PDF document, but you still need to tell Acrobat to make it a fillable form. To proceed, click the Tools button, then the Forms button, and then Create. Acrobat will ask you a couple of questions. On the first screen, make sure "Use an existing file" is selected, then click Next.

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Fill in PDF Form Fields Using the Open Source iTextSharp DLL

The examples here are limited to a description of the procedures associated with completion of a PDF; the download will contain examples of PDF creation in both Visual Basic and C. The examples contained herein are dependent upon the availability of the iTextSharp DLL; use the link provided previously in order to download the DLL locally to your development machine. The form contains controls and may be filled out programmatically so it serves as a good example. PDF documents that do not contain controls; those meant to be printed and filled in with a pencil, cannot be completed using this approach. Further, though not demonstrated here, one can also use iTextSharp to create a PDF document with embedded controls. The solution consists of a single Win Forms project with a single form. All of the project code is contained with the single Windows form.

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