CIBSE TM13 PDF

Log In. Control of Legionella in water systems is an ongoing concern and especially following the outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Edinburgh and Stoke last year. Legionella bacteria are commonly found in sources of water, such as rivers and lakes, but can also contaminate building water systems and services domestic hot and cold water, cooling towers, spa pools, etc. If in these systems the bacteria are allowed to multiply and then become released into the air in water droplets, they can pose a serious problem. Greg Davies, who chaired the work group for TM13 comments: " The guidance has been revised and updated to reflect the legal, environmental and technological advancements we have seen over the last decade. TM13 will help to meet these requirements.

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Log In. It has been ten years since TM13 was last reviewed. Over this time we have seen technology advances and environmental concerns lead to changes in the design and operation of water system to manage the risks of Legionella. While many of the basics of good Legionella control and building services management remain largely the same, our understanding of the risks, processes and schemes by which we can maintain control and demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements have developed. With this in mind TM13 has been updated and revised to provide the information needed to support the effective management of the risks and demonstrate pro-active compliance.

With concerns about the control of Legionella becoming an ever more significant public health issue internationally, TM has been aimed at a readership beyond the UK alone. These Technical Memoranda set out to give guidance on the appropriate design, installation, commissioning, operation and maintenance procedures necessary to minimise the risk of infection by Legionella from water systems within a building.

Principles are highlighted, and practitioners in these fields are encouraged to apply them to their own particular building services applications. While the emphasis is on engineering it is important to recognise that the best engineering solutions can fail and have failed if their operation and implementation are not managed effectively.

Some indications of how to ensure effective management are included. Particularly in the water conservation and environment fields new systems and services have been introduced and, no doubt, further developments will continue. It would be impossible therefore to list and categorise all potential sources of hazard in relation to legionella and building services. What the authors have sought to do is cover in detail the processes associated with the more commonly encountered or potentially higher risk systems and the principles that should be considered for the effective management that should be applied to all other water systems in buildings.

The authors are also aware that specific industry and sector guidance is available and again where appropriate, this has been referenced. This list is not exhaustive however and that information referenced has been chosen to best represent the intended audience of this publication.

It is hoped the appeal of the document and its usefulness will extend beyond this group however. Concerns about the control of Legionella are becoming an ever more significant public health issue internationally. This update has also sought to provide a reference to aspects of non-UK based requirements or guidance that exist. While some of the governing principles for managing the risks may be different, there are many similar themes evident in managing the risks; the processes described in this guidance will provide a valuable further tool in supporting compliance outside the UK.

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Minimising the risk of Legionella in domestic water services

Log In. It has been ten years since TM13 was last reviewed. Over this time we have seen technology advances and environmental concerns lead to changes in the design and operation of water system to manage the risks of Legionella. While many of the basics of good Legionella control and building services management remain largely the same, our understanding of the risks, processes and schemes by which we can maintain control and demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements have developed. With this in mind TM13 has been updated and revised to provide the information needed to support the effective management of the risks and demonstrate pro-active compliance. With concerns about the control of Legionella becoming an ever more significant public health issue internationally, TM has been aimed at a readership beyond the UK alone. These Technical Memoranda set out to give guidance on the appropriate design, installation, commissioning, operation and maintenance procedures necessary to minimise the risk of infection by Legionella from water systems within a building.

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CIBSE TM13 Minimising the Risk of Legionnaires' Disease

Advances in technology, combined with the drive to conserve water through low-flush toilets and low-flow devices, mean current and reliable data on building water consumption must be obtained to ensure demand is assessed more accurately. Without considering the implications of current practices — which reduce or limit building water consumption — demand and water-tank turnover rates can lead to stagnation of water in domestic installations, resulting in public health issues, including bacteria growth. The sizing of all aspects of domestic water systems should, therefore, include an accurate estimation of the anticipated water consumption by the end users. For legionella to proliferate, certain conditions are required, including: 1. For legionella bacteria to amplify, ambient temperature and relative humidity RH need to be exact. Bacteria can proliferate in storage tanks, calorifiers, pipework and plant, filters, thermostatic mixer valves TMVs and particular types of fittings and materials. All bacterium need a substrate — or food source.

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TM13: Minimising the Risk of Legionnaires Disease

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Minimising risk of legionella in domestic water services

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