LEONIN VIDERUNT OMNES PDF

Jubilate Deo, omnis terra. Notum fecit Dominus salutare suum; ante conspectum gentium revelavit justitiam suam. All the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God. Rejoice in the Lord, all lands.

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Out of all the different styles of music we have looked at so far my favorite has been the Gregorian chant. The thing that appeals to me the most about this style is the lack of instruments.

I really enjoyed seeing what the early singers could accomplish with just their voices. So for this post I want to talk a bit more about one of the chants we went over in class, Viderunt Omnes by Perotin.

Viderunt Omnes is a traditional Gregorian chant that is based on a Gradual of the same title. Though the composer of the original chant is unknown, several variations of it have been made over the years. Probably the most famous version of the chant is the one by Perotin, a composer from the Notre Dame school of polyphony.

His version included two voices; one which sang in the familiar style of chant, slow and droning, and another which had a rich polyphony. These two voices symbolized a sense of unity and togetherness but the chant itself was not completely different from its previous versions and in fact, other Gregorian chants.

Perotin, however, introduced a very different variation of this chant. He introduced the Organum Quadrupulum or the four-voice polyphony to the chant which had a drastic effect on the sound produced. The melimas in the chant became so drawn out that the lyrics seemed unintelligible to the listeners, an effect which was amplified by the polyphony. However, the chant is not fully polyphonic and instead is a mixture of polyphony and monophony.

The drawn out melismas also have the added effect of making the change in the tempo of the chant easily noticeable. The last few words and syllables in the chant are closed quickly and the whole chant ends with the voices singing in unison. I really enjoyed the feeling of harmony that this chant creates and that is why I wanted to share some information about it.

The Gregorian chants are also one of the most interesting genres I have encountered this semester. First, I am likely particularly drawn to this genre as I did not grow up listening to these harmonies and textures in church.

Furthermore, rather than the rich harmonies, I was most drawn to how they managed to weave the different textures of the human voice. They make it easy to distinguish the different vocalists while ensuring the lines complement each other.

The moment I saw the title of the work at the top of your post, I knew that I would leave a reply to it because this track is one of my favorite tracks among many others on my playlists. Reading your post I learned that Viderunt Omnes was produced many times by different musicians. Thank you for sharing your analysis of Viderunt Omnes. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account.

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Viderunt Omnes

Out of all the different styles of music we have looked at so far my favorite has been the Gregorian chant. The thing that appeals to me the most about this style is the lack of instruments. I really enjoyed seeing what the early singers could accomplish with just their voices. So for this post I want to talk a bit more about one of the chants we went over in class, Viderunt Omnes by Perotin.

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Leonin: Viderunt Omnes (W.Koa)

Their music, known as organum , adds florid counterpoint to the Gregorian melody of the intonation and verse, portions normally sung by the cantors , the remainder of the chant being sung unchanged by the choir. The text, from Ps. In his variation, the bottom voice sings the familiar chant as a drone while the top voice echoes in rich polyphony—a symbol of religious unity; a form of communal togetherness. Due in large part to the development of mensural notation , his vision became common practice, allowing for discant and clausula. We know that at this time Eudes de Sully , Bishop of Paris , was promoting the use of polyphony. The melismas in particular are especially diminuted , rendering the text virtually incomprehensible. While only solo sections are polyphonic, the organum remains clear when juxtaposed with the traditional, monophonic choir chant.

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